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THE ROYAL INSTITUTION OF CHARTERED SURVEYORS
Monday, November 26, 2012 05:30:13

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) is an independent, representative professional body which regulates property professionals and surveyors in the United Kingdom and other sovereign nations.

RICS provides education and training standards, protects consumers with strict codes of practice and advises governments and business. RICS provides expertise in matters involving fixed assets, including but not limited to land and real property.


History

The institution was founded London as the "Institution of Surveyors" after a meeting of 49 surveyors at the Westminster Palace Hotel on 15 June 1868. The inaugural chairman was John Clutton (who founded Clutton's estate agency, still one of the largest estate agents in the UK). It has occupied headquarters on the corner of Great George Street andParliament Square since then. The institution received its Royal Charter in 1881 and in 1921 was granted Royal Patronage by George V.

The Institution of Surveyors became the "Institution of Chartered Surveyors" in 1930. In 1946 the institution became a royal institution entitled to add "Royal" to its name and, thereby, achieved its present name.

 

RICS is headquartered in London with 14 regional offices in the United Kingdom.

In 2009, RICS was represented or had affiliates in more than 146 countries and had a worldwide membership of more than 159,000. The majority of members are still based in the United Kingdom but there is now a strong international membership in Commonwealth countries such as Canada, Hong Kong and Australia, and membership is growing rapidly in the United States and across Europe, Asia,Middle East and North Africa and India.

 

Membership

Entry to membership of the RICS is via four main routes: academic; graduate; technical; and senior professional. The RICS has links with universities worldwide, with whom they have accredited approved courses which satisfy part of the qualification requirements to become trainee surveyors. The RICS also offers expedited routes to membership for qualified professional members of some partner associations.

Members must update their knowledge and competence during their working life through RICS' Continuous Professional Development regulations so the advice they give will be of the highest and most professional standard.

 

Designations

• Associate members may use "AssocRICS" after their names (previously members at this level were known as Technical Members and used the designation "TechRICS").[2]

• Professional Members may use "MRICS" after their names (previously members at this level were known as Professional Associates and used the designation "ARICS").

• Fellows, senior members,  may use "FRICS" after their names.

 

Professional Members and Fellows of the RICS are entitled to use the designation "Chartered Surveyor" and variations such as "Chartered Building Surveyor" or "Chartered Quantity Surveyor" - depending on their chosen specialist qualifications and field of expertise. For example, not all RICS members who undertake building surveys are actually Chartered Building Surveyors (less than 10% of the RICS membership are Chartered Building Surveyors).

 

RICS is headquartered in London with 14 regional offices in the United Kingdom.

In 2009, RICS was represented or had affiliates in more than 146 countries and had a worldwide membership of more than 159,000. The majority of members are still based in the United Kingdom but there is now a strong international membership in Commonwealth countries such as Canada, Hong Kong and Australia, and membership is growing rapidly in the United States and across Europe, Asia,Middle East and North Africa and India.

 

Membership

Entry to membership of the RICS is via four main routes: academic; graduate; technical; and senior professional. The RICS has links with universities worldwide, with whom they have accredited approved courses which satisfy part of the qualification requirements to become trainee surveyors. The RICS also offers expedited routes to membership for qualified professional members of some partner associations.

Members must update their knowledge and competence during their working life through RICS' Continuous Professional Development regulations so the advice they give will be of the highest and most professional standard.

 

Designations

• Associate members may use "AssocRICS" after their names (previously members at this level were known as Technical Members and used the designation "TechRICS").[2]

• Professional Members may use "MRICS" after their names (previously members at this level were known as Professional Associates and used the designation "ARICS").

• Fellows, senior members,  may use "FRICS" after their names.

Professional Members and Fellows of the RICS are entitled to use the designation "Chartered Surveyor" and variations such as "Chartered Building Surveyor" or "Chartered Quantity Surveyor" - depending on their chosen specialist qualifications and field of expertise. For example, not all RICS members who undertake building surveys are actually Chartered Building Surveyors (less than 10% of the RICS membership are Chartered Building Surveyors).